"Superpowers" Community Chat

The word “superpower” evokes pride in some and envy in others. It is a term synonymous with control and domination throughout the world but can also be attributed to oppressed people finding empowerment whether inwardly or outwardly to overcome terrorizing circumstances.

Earlier this month we mentioned “As Africans, we should have our own superpowers - those that will devote their energies to serving our continent. As youthful, vibrant Africans, we are our Superpowers. We’re all privileged in one form or another, and this places a huge responsibility on our shoulders. Is the privilege for our personal use or the greater good? You be the judge.

This April, as we explore the theme of Superpowers, lets get thinking and talking about where we stand on the world stage, our leadership and all the problems with the imbalance of power across the globe. We’ve all got some superpowers but what have we done with them? Aren’t you tired of not calling the shots?”

This is the conversation that Rise Africa would like to have with you. Let us tackle the topic of superpowers on a personal and international level. How can Africa develop so that it too can have a voice on world affairs? What is the role of the individual African citizen in bettering the continent? Join us April 26th for our monthly community chat to participate in this discussion.

If you are interested in joining our live video chat this Saturday, April 26th at 12:00 pm CT | 1:00 pm ET | 6:00 pm GMT | 7:00 pm EAT | 8:00 pm SAST, please fill out this sign up form or e-mail us at info@africaisdonesuffering.com with the subject line: “Rise Africa Community Chat.” If you confirm participation and are selected to join us we will notify you via e-mail.

If you are not interested in participating in the live chat portion of the conversation but would still like to be a part of the discussion, this chat will be broadcasted live via Youtube where you are free to watch the discourse and contribute your thoughts via Twitter. We hope you’ll consider joining and look forward to hearing from you! [Number of live chat participants is limited.]

africaisdonesuffering:

Superheroes Don’t Have To Wear Capes

Mention the word superhero and certain images snap to mind: flying, x-ray vision, supersonic speed, and spandex, to name a few. If I had a superhuman power, I’d like it to be super-human strength; mind, body, it doesn’t matter. I’d never be defeated!

Strength is a requirement for so many people around the world, but more specifically, immigrants who have mustered up whatever strength they can to start anew in a foreign country. Whether it’s for the pursuit of money, happiness or freedom, the end result is usually worth the leap…and then sometimes it isn’t.

Meet Fatoumatah Binta Bah. Binta is from Guinea-Conakry, and moved to the United States with her husband in the late ‘90s. After a healthy pregnancy, their first child, Amina, was born with brain damage. Binta was sent home without knowledge of Amina’s condition. Six months later, equipped with a bigger English vocabulary to speak with doctors, Binta learned her child would never have a “normal” life.

Following years of depression, lawsuits, and doctor visits, Binta decided to write a book telling her story and alerting immigrants to their rights within the American healthcare system.

If you combine the Bah family’s immense strength and Binta’s fight for justice, they are the very definition of superhero.

Visit this link for more information or to give donations: gofundme.com/69jhsk

africaisdonesuffering:

[ATTN POETRY ENTHUSIASTS]: In honor of National Poetry Month…

You’re Invited! Join Rise Africa along with spoken word artist and activist Pages Matam and Temple University’s Poetry Collective Babel this Tuesday, April 22nd, 6:00 pm at Towson University for our free poetry showcase “Shredded Words: Empowerment by the Pen." We hope to see you there!

Superheroes Don’t Have To Wear Capes

Mention the word superhero and certain images snap to mind: flying, x-ray vision, supersonic speed, and spandex, to name a few. If I had a superhuman power, I’d like it to be super-human strength; mind, body, it doesn’t matter. I’d never be defeated!

Strength is a requirement for so many people around the world, but more specifically, immigrants who have mustered up whatever strength they can to start anew in a foreign country. Whether it’s for the pursuit of money, happiness or freedom, the end result is usually worth the leap…and then sometimes it isn’t.

Meet Fatoumatah Binta Bah. Binta is from Guinea-Conakry, and moved to the United States with her husband in the late ‘90s. After a healthy pregnancy, their first child, Amina, was born with brain damage. Binta was sent home without knowledge of Amina’s condition. Six months later, equipped with a bigger English vocabulary to speak with doctors, Binta learned her child would never have a “normal” life.

Following years of depression, lawsuits, and doctor visits, Binta decided to write a book telling her story and alerting immigrants to their rights within the American healthcare system.

If you combine the Bah family’s immense strength and Binta’s fight for justice, they are the very definition of superhero.

Visit this link for more information or to give donations: gofundme.com/69jhsk

africaisdonesuffering:

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “Lebogang Mashile”

Lebogang Mashile is a poet, performer, actress, presenter and producer born to exiled South African parents in 1979. She returned to her home country at the age of 16 to study law and international relation at Wits University in Johannesburg and it was there that her love for art consumed her.

Mashile describes poetry as the most effective tool to bring about changes in mental attitudes that are needed in the aftermath of the socio-political changes in post-apartheid South Africa. “The enemy isn’t really clear in the way it was before. It’s an incredibly sensitive, complicated struggle with many dimensions, but the site for that struggle is inside. The language of poetry comes from a place where that transformation has to begin, that sort of intuitive, creative, spiritual searching place that will be the fuel for any kind of transformation process.”

Along with other South African poetesses, in 2003, she founded the Feela Sista! Spoken Word Collective. You may also recognize her face from the film Hotel Rwanda, where she made her debut as an actress.

With her publications and performances having a direct impact on issues relating to gender, Mashile is undeniably one of the most powerful poets in South Africa.

Read Lebogang Mashile’s poem “ABCs”

africaisdonesuffering:

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “Lebogang Mashile”
Lebogang Mashile is a poet, performer, actress, presenter and producer born to exiled South African parents in 1979. She returned to her home country at the age of 16 to study law and international relation at Wits University in Johannesburg and it was there that her love for art consumed her.
Mashile describes poetry as the most effective tool to bring about changes in mental attitudes that are needed in the aftermath of the socio-political changes in post-apartheid South Africa. “The enemy isn’t really clear in the way it was before. It’s an incredibly sensitive, complicated struggle with many dimensions, but the site for that struggle is inside. The language of poetry comes from a place where that transformation has to begin, that sort of intuitive, creative, spiritual searching place that will be the fuel for any kind of transformation process.”
Along with other South African poetesses, in 2003, she founded the Feela Sista! Spoken Word Collective. You may also recognize her face from the film Hotel Rwanda, where she made her debut as an actress.
With her publications and performances having a direct impact on issues relating to gender, Mashile is undeniably one of the most powerful poets in South Africa.
Read Lebogang Mashile’s poem “ABCs” High-res

somaliwomen:

Dr Asha Omar, a veteran Somali gynecologist visited Baidoa’s AMISOM hospital to offer her medical expertise in reproductive health. Dr Asha provided antenatal care including hi-tech CT scan services for expectant mothers as well as offered free gynecological consultation, treatment and checkups. Women in Baidoa often have to travel as far as Galkayo or Mogadishu to receive treatment in this feild

somaliwomen:

Dr Asha Omar, a veteran Somali gynecologist visited Baidoa’s AMISOM hospital to offer her medical expertise in reproductive health. Dr Asha provided antenatal care including hi-tech CT scan services for expectant mothers as well as offered free gynecological consultation, treatment and checkups. Women in Baidoa often have to travel as far as Galkayo or Mogadishu to receive treatment in this feild High-res

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “Lebogang Mashile”

Lebogang Mashile is a poet, performer, actress, presenter and producer born to exiled South African parents in 1979. She returned to her home country at the age of 16 to study law and international relation at Wits University in Johannesburg and it was there that her love for art consumed her.

Mashile describes poetry as the most effective tool to bring about changes in mental attitudes that are needed in the aftermath of the socio-political changes in post-apartheid South Africa. “The enemy isn’t really clear in the way it was before. It’s an incredibly sensitive, complicated struggle with many dimensions, but the site for that struggle is inside. The language of poetry comes from a place where that transformation has to begin, that sort of intuitive, creative, spiritual searching place that will be the fuel for any kind of transformation process.”

Along with other South African poetesses, in 2003, she founded the Feela Sista! Spoken Word Collective. You may also recognize her face from the film Hotel Rwanda, where she made her debut as an actress.

With her publications and performances having a direct impact on issues relating to gender, Mashile is undeniably one of the most powerful poets in South Africa.

Read Lebogang Mashile’s poem “ABCs”

Women in Africa and the Diaspora: “Lebogang Mashile”
Lebogang Mashile is a poet, performer, actress, presenter and producer born to exiled South African parents in 1979. She returned to her home country at the age of 16 to study law and international relation at Wits University in Johannesburg and it was there that her love for art consumed her.
Mashile describes poetry as the most effective tool to bring about changes in mental attitudes that are needed in the aftermath of the socio-political changes in post-apartheid South Africa. “The enemy isn’t really clear in the way it was before. It’s an incredibly sensitive, complicated struggle with many dimensions, but the site for that struggle is inside. The language of poetry comes from a place where that transformation has to begin, that sort of intuitive, creative, spiritual searching place that will be the fuel for any kind of transformation process.”
Along with other South African poetesses, in 2003, she founded the Feela Sista! Spoken Word Collective. You may also recognize her face from the film Hotel Rwanda, where she made her debut as an actress.
With her publications and performances having a direct impact on issues relating to gender, Mashile is undeniably one of the most powerful poets in South Africa.
Read Lebogang Mashile’s poem “ABCs” High-res

ourafrica:

Kinshasa the capital of Democratic Republic of Congo is no ordinary city and at first seems an unlikely place to have an orchestra of two hundred musicians playing to Beethoven Ninth –Freude schöner Götterfunken. “Orchestre Symphonique Kimbanguisteisthe only symphony orchestra in the Congo has been in existence for 15 yrs. Riddled often with power strikes, even on performance nights, seems the least of the worries of this symphony. Kinshasa Symphony directed by Martin Baer, Claus Wischmann is a study of people in one of the world’s most chaotic cities doing their best to maintain one of the most complex systems of joint human endeavour: a symphony. The film is about the Congo, the people in Kinshasa and the power of music.

The film closely follows a few of the band members and gives a view of their personal lives, how they make a living and struggle to make it to almost daily practices. We get to see the symphony overcome odds as they prepare for an open concert with thousands attending.

The DRC does not stop with these classical musicians all self taught amateurs or trained by other musicians unfamiliar in classical training with instruments like the cello, cello bass or violin. Kinshasa continues to stand out with its remarkable musicians forming this indie breed of rudimentary collectives that play with scrap yard instruments yet seem to stand on stages from Brooklyn to Paris. Other bands I should make note of are : Konono Nº1 who collaborated with Bjork on the song earth intruders and more recently with Herbie Hancock and Baloji. Also take note of Kasai All Stars.

Kinshasa Symphony has made its rounds in the theatre circuit and is available on DVD. Its playing as part of the featured screenings  next week, in New York’s College music festival CMJ.

Here is the trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=_vTk0XsgZV4

Info via, African digital art

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(via ourafrica)

[ATTN POETRY ENTHUSIASTS]: In honor of National Poetry Month…

You’re Invited! Join Rise Africa along with spoken word artist and activist Pages Matam and Temple University’s Poetry Collective Babel this Tuesday, April 22nd, 6:00 pm at Towson University for our free poetry showcase “Shredded Words: Empowerment by the Pen." We hope to see you there!

africaisdonesuffering:

African Cultures Connect [African-Australian]

Last month in Sydney’s Auburn Park, the 6th annual “Africultures Festival” was held. This year, the event was dedicated to celebrating Nelson Mandela. With the different African communities showcasing their talents and businesses, the festival exposed both Africans and Australians to a massive union of African people(s). The event featured Africans uniting to celebrate our different cultures, foods and traditions.

Throughout the festival you could see people enjoying and atmosphere filled with poets, dancers, arts and crafts, and fashion designers. There was also a wide range of community organisations that gave information on living in the diaspora, sexual health, and community support groups for women, men and children.

Above are a few of the pictures I captured.

Growth is necessary for the people of the African continent to rise from the suffocating shadows of poverty, however that growth does not have to include designs on superpower status. So many conflicts have, and continue to ravage our nations. Wars have continued for decades grinding progress, and hope, to a standstill. Death is jealous master; education, healthcare, innovation, art all stand outside in the cold, as death takes center stage. Though many brave African souls push forward, denying violence purchase, condemning the claims warfare has placed on their lands, the crusade for dominance on the African continent continues to plow through families, villages, towns, and countries leaving carnage in its wake. So, if decades of conflict have not brought us into the sun, then perhaps a different way, a new approach is needed. Maybe, if we shift our focus from Nigeria or South Africa’s rapid growth to the growth of our weak, our poor, and our undervalued—if we govern from the *original position—perhaps then we will have true power.

Chinwe Ohanele; Subtle Powers

dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.

It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.

“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”

African Cultures Connect [African-Australian]

Last month in Sydney’s Auburn Park, the 6th annual “Africultures Festival” was held. This year, the event was dedicated to celebrating Nelson Mandela. With the different African communities showcasing their talents and businesses, the festival exposed both Africans and Australians to a massive union of African people(s). The event featured Africans uniting to celebrate our different cultures, foods and traditions.

Throughout the festival you could see people enjoying and atmosphere filled with poets, dancers, arts and crafts, and fashion designers. There was also a wide range of community organisations that gave information on living in the diaspora, sexual health, and community support groups for women, men and children.

Above are a few of the pictures I captured.