africaisdonesuffering:

African Cultures Connect [African-Australian]

Last month in Sydney’s Auburn Park, the 6th annual “Africultures Festival” was held. This year, the event was dedicated to celebrating Nelson Mandela. With the different African communities showcasing their talents and businesses, the festival exposed both Africans and Australians to a massive union of African people(s). The event featured Africans uniting to celebrate our different cultures, foods and traditions.

Throughout the festival you could see people enjoying and atmosphere filled with poets, dancers, arts and crafts, and fashion designers. There was also a wide range of community organisations that gave information on living in the diaspora, sexual health, and community support groups for women, men and children.

Above are a few of the pictures I captured.

Growth is necessary for the people of the African continent to rise from the suffocating shadows of poverty, however that growth does not have to include designs on superpower status. So many conflicts have, and continue to ravage our nations. Wars have continued for decades grinding progress, and hope, to a standstill. Death is jealous master; education, healthcare, innovation, art all stand outside in the cold, as death takes center stage. Though many brave African souls push forward, denying violence purchase, condemning the claims warfare has placed on their lands, the crusade for dominance on the African continent continues to plow through families, villages, towns, and countries leaving carnage in its wake. So, if decades of conflict have not brought us into the sun, then perhaps a different way, a new approach is needed. Maybe, if we shift our focus from Nigeria or South Africa’s rapid growth to the growth of our weak, our poor, and our undervalued—if we govern from the *original position—perhaps then we will have true power.

Chinwe Ohanele; Subtle Powers

dynamicafrica:

"The Untold Renaissance": Ikire Jones Spring/Summer 2014 Lookbook.

It’s all dapper hommes, suave strides and bold prints and patterns in Nigerian designer Wale Oyejide’s Spring/Summer 2014 lookbook for his brand Ikire Jones.

“This collection pays homage to 18th century textiles and tapestries while exploring the absence of persons of color in Medieval and Renaissance-era European art.  Borrowing from the sampling method employed in hip hop culture, each reinvented piece tells an original narrative from the perspective of Africans who have been placed in an alien context.  Through this reverse lens to the past, the present circumstances of individuals who feel displaced and alienated may also be considered.”

African Cultures Connect [African-Australian]

Last month in Sydney’s Auburn Park, the 6th annual “Africultures Festival” was held. This year, the event was dedicated to celebrating Nelson Mandela. With the different African communities showcasing their talents and businesses, the festival exposed both Africans and Australians to a massive union of African people(s). The event featured Africans uniting to celebrate our different cultures, foods and traditions.

Throughout the festival you could see people enjoying and atmosphere filled with poets, dancers, arts and crafts, and fashion designers. There was also a wide range of community organisations that gave information on living in the diaspora, sexual health, and community support groups for women, men and children.

Above are a few of the pictures I captured.

africaisdonesuffering:

African Privilege

We’ve all got some superpowers but what do we do with them?

As an African living in America, the first thing that comes to my mind when I think of my condition are the challenges I face living in a host country. There are some relatively  minor problems like the  deciphering the myriad of euphemisms that pepper the speech of the average American, and  then there are major issues such as lack of comprehensive immigration reform and astronomical out of state tuition fee’s students deemed “non-resident” have to pay for university. With these and other issues to maneuver, it is easy to get caught up in the negative and adopt an underdog mentality which comes with feeling that the odds are stacked against you. On the other hand, there is a phenomenon that is present in certain situations, one that for illustrative purposes and also in order to sound cool and hip I will call “African Privilege.” What is “African privilege” you ask? Well it is the privilege of being black, but not African-American in the United States– A circumstance that often excludes Africans from the certain challenges that African-Americans face in America today. One in which Africans experience a more patronizing type of racism, but is still racism nonetheless. (read more)

africaisdonesuffering:

African Privilege
We’ve all got some superpowers but what do we do with them?
As an African living in America, the first thing that comes to my mind when I think of my condition are the challenges I face living in a host country. There are some relatively  minor problems like the  deciphering the myriad of euphemisms that pepper the speech of the average American, and  then there are major issues such as lack of comprehensive immigration reform and astronomical out of state tuition fee’s students deemed “non-resident” have to pay for university. With these and other issues to maneuver, it is easy to get caught up in the negative and adopt an underdog mentality which comes with feeling that the odds are stacked against you. On the other hand, there is a phenomenon that is present in certain situations, one that for illustrative purposes and also in order to sound cool and hip I will call “African Privilege.” What is “African privilege” you ask? Well it is the privilege of being black, but not African-American in the United States– A circumstance that often excludes Africans from the certain challenges that African-Americans face in America today. One in which Africans experience a more patronizing type of racism, but is still racism nonetheless. (read more) High-res

somaliwomen:

Somali women are doing their part in rebuilding the country post civil war Naema Adam is more literally than others.

Naema Adam has set up a brick laying business and is one of the many Somalis tracing their steps back home.

She lived in London for 24 years, having initially gone to pursue her studies in college. The start of the civil war meant she had to stay back in England, from where she completed her university education, got married and had three children. She says her choice of the brick laying business was informed by the visit to Somalia last year, during which she realized the shortage in quality building materials, deciding to move in and fill the gap.

“It was a wild idea for a mother to do this, but I thought it was worthwhile in the end. I had spoken to lots of locals and engineers and I had done some research. I then realized a bricklayer is really needed. Mogadishu is rebuilding, so I decided not to lose the opportunity,” says Naema

She has undoubtedly encountered many challenges, including the high cost of importing machinery. “Another way the government could help is to at least give discount on the tax at the port which would make it easier to import machinery and not products and let the people produce the products within the country,” she appeals.

somaliwomen:

Somali women are doing their part in rebuilding the country post civil war Naema Adam is more literally than others.
Naema Adam has set up a brick laying business and is one of the many Somalis tracing their steps back home.

She lived in London for 24 years, having initially gone to pursue her studies in college. The start of the civil war meant she had to stay back in England, from where she completed her university education, got married and had three children. She says her choice of the brick laying business was informed by the visit to Somalia last year, during which she realized the shortage in quality building materials, deciding to move in and fill the gap.
“It was a wild idea for a mother to do this, but I thought it was worthwhile in the end. I had spoken to lots of locals and engineers and I had done some research. I then realized a bricklayer is really needed. Mogadishu is rebuilding, so I decided not to lose the opportunity,” says Naema
She has undoubtedly encountered many challenges, including the high cost of importing machinery. “Another way the government could help is to at least give discount on the tax at the port which would make it easier to import machinery and not products and let the people produce the products within the country,” she appeals. High-res

African Privilege

We’ve all got some superpowers but what do we do with them?

As an African living in America, the first thing that comes to my mind when I think of my condition are the challenges I face living in a host country. There are some relatively  minor problems like the  deciphering the myriad of euphemisms that pepper the speech of the average American, and  then there are major issues such as lack of comprehensive immigration reform and astronomical out of state tuition fee’s students deemed “non-resident” have to pay for university. With these and other issues to maneuver, it is easy to get caught up in the negative and adopt an underdog mentality which comes with feeling that the odds are stacked against you. On the other hand, there is a phenomenon that is present in certain situations, one that for illustrative purposes and also in order to sound cool and hip I will call “African Privilege.” What is “African privilege” you ask? Well it is the privilege of being black, but not African-American in the United States– A circumstance that often excludes Africans from the certain challenges that African-Americans face in America today. One in which Africans experience a more patronizing type of racism, but is still racism nonetheless. (read more)

African Privilege
We’ve all got some superpowers but what do we do with them?
As an African living in America, the first thing that comes to my mind when I think of my condition are the challenges I face living in a host country. There are some relatively  minor problems like the  deciphering the myriad of euphemisms that pepper the speech of the average American, and  then there are major issues such as lack of comprehensive immigration reform and astronomical out of state tuition fee’s students deemed “non-resident” have to pay for university. With these and other issues to maneuver, it is easy to get caught up in the negative and adopt an underdog mentality which comes with feeling that the odds are stacked against you. On the other hand, there is a phenomenon that is present in certain situations, one that for illustrative purposes and also in order to sound cool and hip I will call “African Privilege.” What is “African privilege” you ask? Well it is the privilege of being black, but not African-American in the United States– A circumstance that often excludes Africans from the certain challenges that African-Americans face in America today. One in which Africans experience a more patronizing type of racism, but is still racism nonetheless. (read more) High-res

Pages Matam is an author, spoken word performer, and activist. You may have watched his raw performance in “Piñata" where Pages addresses rape culture. He was born in Cameroon and immigrated to the US at the age of 10, where he currently resides in the DC metropolitan area. He pursued poetry professionally even after the friction it caused for himself and his family. He realized the power of words and hopes that his art can not only entertain, but create healthy and positive dialogue as he stated in his submission to our November Feminism theme.

Join Pages along with Temple University’s BabelTowson Voices, and Rise Africa next Tuesday, April 22nd, 6:00 pm at Towson University for our free poetry showcase “Shredded Words: Empowerment by the Pen." We hope to see you there!

Pages Matam is an author, spoken word performer, and activist. You may have watched his raw performance in “Piñata" where Pages addresses rape culture. He was born in Cameroon and immigrated to the US at the age of 10, where he currently resides in the DC metropolitan area. He pursued poetry professionally even after the friction it caused for himself and his family. He realized the power of words and hopes that his art can not only entertain, but create healthy and positive dialogue as he stated in his submission to our November Feminism theme.
Join Pages along with Temple University’s Babel, Towson Voices, and Rise Africa next Tuesday, April 22nd, 6:00 pm at Towson University for our free poetry showcase “Shredded Words: Empowerment by the Pen." We hope to see you there! High-res

[COMMUNITY] Hope of Guinea

Hope of Guinea is a non-governmental organization created to help the underprivileged children of Guinea. They believe that nurturing, caring and guiding children in the right path by promoting education is the cornerstones of human progress. Hope of Guinea was created with this purpose in mind to work with others to promote education and overcome violence, discrimination, and sexual abuse against the underprivileged children of Guinea.

While all children are born equal, they do not grow up the same and do not receive the same opportunities in life. Hope of Guinea was created to not only to be the voice of disadvantaged children but to support them in any which way possible. They aspire to close the gap between children who have every opportunity to succeed and those who do not. Every successful person has been helped along way therefore it is Hope of Guinea’s mission to give back to its community by putting in place a mechanism that will positively change and enhance many lives. The Board of Directors and Hope of Guinea in its entirety pledges to help promote a better life and better future for the underprivileged. As John F. Kennedy said “Ask not what your country can do for you…ask what you can do for your country.”

As a non-profit organization, and as a team, Hope of Guinea values integrity, honesty, openness, excellence, determination, constructive self-criticism, and mutual respect. They are committed to their country, children, and have a passion for achieving a greater good for their beloved country. They take on big challenges, and pride themselves on seeing them through. They hold themsleves accountable to their community, donors, and volunteers by honoring their commitments, providing results, and striving for the highest educative equality between the children of Guinea.

In regards to the donations to the scholarship fund, their scholarships will help  cover tuition, uniforms, school supplies, a tutor and other education related expenses. Hope of Guinea currently has 12 scholarship recipients – 8 girls and 4 boys – whose education will be covered until they graduate high school.

Hope of Guinea has partnered with the County of Dixinn in Conakry, Guinea to build a free public library. The library will be housed at the Jozip Broz Tito Elementary and Middle School, located in the city of Belle-Vu. The library will be free of charge and available to all students (kindergarten to high school) in the capital area. They are looking for donations to go towards a fund for the setup of the library as well as computers, heavy-duty printers and scanners along with other necessary educational software.

Connect with Hope of Guinea: Twitter | Website | Donate to Hope of Guinea

[COMMUNITY] Hope of Guinea

Hope of Guinea is a non-governmental organization created to help the underprivileged children of Guinea. They believe that nurturing, caring and guiding children in the right path by promoting education is the cornerstones of human progress. Hope of Guinea was created with this purpose in mind to work with others to promote education and overcome violence, discrimination, and sexual abuse against the underprivileged children of Guinea.
While all children are born equal, they do not grow up the same and do not receive the same opportunities in life. Hope of Guinea was created to not only to be the voice of disadvantaged children but to support them in any which way possible. They aspire to close the gap between children who have every opportunity to succeed and those who do not. Every successful person has been helped along way therefore it is Hope of Guinea’s mission to give back to its community by putting in place a mechanism that will positively change and enhance many lives. The Board of Directors and Hope of Guinea in its entirety pledges to help promote a better life and better future for the underprivileged. As John F. Kennedy said “Ask not what your country can do for you…ask what you can do for your country.”
As a non-profit organization, and as a team, Hope of Guinea values integrity, honesty, openness, excellence, determination, constructive self-criticism, and mutual respect. They are committed to their country, children, and have a passion for achieving a greater good for their beloved country. They take on big challenges, and pride themselves on seeing them through. They hold themsleves accountable to their community, donors, and volunteers by honoring their commitments, providing results, and striving for the highest educative equality between the children of Guinea.
In regards to the donations to the scholarship fund, their scholarships will help  cover tuition, uniforms, school supplies, a tutor and other education related expenses. Hope of Guinea currently has 12 scholarship recipients – 8 girls and 4 boys – whose education will be covered until they graduate high school.

Hope of Guinea has partnered with the County of Dixinn in Conakry, Guinea to build a free public library. The library will be housed at the Jozip Broz Tito Elementary and Middle School, located in the city of Belle-Vu. The library will be free of charge and available to all students (kindergarten to high school) in the capital area. They are looking for donations to go towards a fund for the setup of the library as well as computers, heavy-duty printers and scanners along with other necessary educational software.
Connect with Hope of Guinea: Twitter | Website | Donate to Hope of Guinea High-res

Links to jobs in Ghana

whyghana:

image

After the post about work in Ghana I felt it only right to put up some links to help you start your search (if you are ready to make the move). 

Jobs in Ghana   Is a great site to visit and look for potential jobs based on categories

Ghana Web  Is basically a hub with links to jobs posted on other sites (like Jobs in Ghana)

ehjuma.com   (the Akan word for work) Offers  users SMS job alerts

Happy Job hunting. 

(via africanobsession)

africaisdonesuffering:

Talk Africa: “Subtle Powers”

The global history of superpowers is one fraught with violence, force, war, terror, and imposed ideations of culture, and language. Even now, in modern times, where nations once colonized are now independent nation states, the influence of the past is still present in treaties between states, sanctions against others, and alliances amongst most. When Rwanda blames the French government for the part they played in the Rwandan genocide, the French balk. However, when the British practice racist immigration policies that create increased burdens on former British territories like Nigeria, crickets are heard singing loudly.

Superpowers are not just countries with a super economy, consistently high GDP, and unparalleled infrastructure. No, superpowers are countries that dole out punishments in the international community; they decide whether to abide by UN directives, or whether to adopt international guidelines at all. These are the countries that broker peace treaties, write the fine print, collect resources, and engineer ‘peaceable’ transitions of power in other countries. (read more)

africaisdonesuffering:

Talk Africa: “Subtle Powers”
The global history of superpowers is one fraught with violence, force, war, terror, and imposed ideations of culture, and language. Even now, in modern times, where nations once colonized are now independent nation states, the influence of the past is still present in treaties between states, sanctions against others, and alliances amongst most. When Rwanda blames the French government for the part they played in the Rwandan genocide, the French balk. However, when the British practice racist immigration policies that create increased burdens on former British territories like Nigeria, crickets are heard singing loudly.
Superpowers are not just countries with a super economy, consistently high GDP, and unparalleled infrastructure. No, superpowers are countries that dole out punishments in the international community; they decide whether to abide by UN directives, or whether to adopt international guidelines at all. These are the countries that broker peace treaties, write the fine print, collect resources, and engineer ‘peaceable’ transitions of power in other countries. (read more)
High-res

Babel is Temple University’s poetry collective located in North Philadelphia, PA. The group focuses not only on spoken word but also the advancement of the arts throughout  the city of Philadelphia. Babel consists of young, fresh students who as a group have made considerable growth in the recent year through live performances and hosting free writing workshops.

Join Babel along with Pages Matam, Towson Voices, and Rise Africa next Tuesday, April 22nd, 6:00 pm at Towson University for our free poetry showcase “Shredded Words: Empowerment by the Pen." We hope to see you there!

Babel is Temple University’s poetry collective located in North Philadelphia, PA. The group focuses not only on spoken word but also the advancement of the arts throughout  the city of Philadelphia. Babel consists of young, fresh students who as a group have made considerable growth in the recent year through live performances and hosting free writing workshops.
Join Babel along with Pages Matam, Towson Voices, and Rise Africa next Tuesday, April 22nd, 6:00 pm at Towson University for our free poetry showcase “Shredded Words: Empowerment by the Pen." We hope to see you there! High-res