International Media and Africa’s Immaturity problem 

To hear global news tell it, “Africa” is a rebellious teenager, angry and full of hate, violent and one jump, skip, and hop away from Juvenile Detention. Everyday we hear about what’s wrong with “Africa,” and there is seldom an attempt to distinguish the country from the continent; the nouns are used interchangeably most times. As a result, one country’s ills are attributed to the whole continent, unless your people look Arabic, then you may get a pass. The gang of “Africa” with its repeat offenders Nigeria, DR Congo, Libya, Uganda, and others, often appear in the headlines next to words like, bombing, killing, crashed, corruption, AIDS, and aide. Very rarely do “we” do anything right.

Even when “we” try to grow up by developing our journalists, pop culture magazines, movies, demonstrations and civil protest, they are invariable compared to the Western model and deemed inferior. “We” always have a lot to learn.

Whatever good we produce is not ours to claim, and if we do, the world waits with batted breath for us to screw things up. So, imagine my surprise when among all the articles on squalor and strife, BBC publishes a picture series asking whether “Africa’s” image is unfair.

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International Media and Africa’s Immaturity problem 
To hear global news tell it, “Africa” is a rebellious teenager, angry and full of hate, violent and one jump, skip, and hop away from Juvenile Detention. Everyday we hear about what’s wrong with “Africa,” and there is seldom an attempt to distinguish the country from the continent; the nouns are used interchangeably most times. As a result, one country’s ills are attributed to the whole continent, unless your people look Arabic, then you may get a pass. The gang of “Africa” with its repeat offenders Nigeria, DR Congo, Libya, Uganda, and others, often appear in the headlines next to words like, bombing, killing, crashed, corruption, AIDS, and aide. Very rarely do “we” do anything right.
Even when “we” try to grow up by developing our journalists, pop culture magazines, movies, demonstrations and civil protest, they are invariable compared to the Western model and deemed inferior. “We” always have a lot to learn.
Whatever good we produce is not ours to claim, and if we do, the world waits with batted breath for us to screw things up. So, imagine my surprise when among all the articles on squalor and strife, BBC publishes a picture series asking whether “Africa’s” image is unfair.
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