Kuduro music is changing the electronic music and dance scene one single at a time.

Every day in Angola, people are dancing the night away to some of the freshest beats on the African continent. If you think the songs you listen to while dancing at the bars are intense, you haven’t heard Kuduro music.

If this is the first time you’ve heard of Kuduro, that needs to change ASAP. It is an amazing genre whose name literally means “stiff bottom” or “hard ass” in Portuguese, which is used in Kimbundu language. This name comes from the provocative booty shaking dance moves present in a Kuduro music video that often leads to a tight behind.

Once you start listening to these kinds of songs, believe me, you will not be able to remain sitting. The beat begins to take over your body and dancing becomes compulsory. From these strong dancing urges come moves you didn’t even know you were capable of. You will become twice the dancer you thought you were and pick up some Portuguese along the way.

It’s only fitting that the roots of the genre came in the 1980s. At this time, musicians in Angola’s capital city of Luanda began to mix beats, or “batida,” that sounded very much like hip-hop infused with electronic, with soca, rumba and even some punk thrown in every now and again.

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Kuduro music is changing the electronic music and dance scene one single at a time.
Every day in Angola, people are dancing the night away to some of the freshest beats on the African continent. If you think the songs you listen to while dancing at the bars are intense, you haven’t heard Kuduro music.
If this is the first time you’ve heard of Kuduro, that needs to change ASAP. It is an amazing genre whose name literally means “stiff bottom” or “hard ass” in Portuguese, which is used in Kimbundu language. This name comes from the provocative booty shaking dance moves present in a Kuduro music video that often leads to a tight behind.
Once you start listening to these kinds of songs, believe me, you will not be able to remain sitting. The beat begins to take over your body and dancing becomes compulsory. From these strong dancing urges come moves you didn’t even know you were capable of. You will become twice the dancer you thought you were and pick up some Portuguese along the way.
It’s only fitting that the roots of the genre came in the 1980s. At this time, musicians in Angola’s capital city of Luanda began to mix beats, or “batida,” that sounded very much like hip-hop infused with electronic, with soca, rumba and even some punk thrown in every now and again.
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