March 2013: Freelance

A mischievous smile widened my lips. I liked this world. I was glad I was born in this era. There’s a vast wealth of information, an app for anything that makes you tick and for every sport. We know from the beginning he gets the diamonds so we know that is not the point of the movie. So, what is the point? As secure as I feel in my identity as a Ugandan-American, I fear the dissolution of being “Ugandan” without an understanding of “my” language. Those sketches became actual illustrations and it was asked that they be used for the South African Pavillion in the 2010 Shanghai World Expo. What future are we talking about? What kinds of things do you expect from the continent? When we be pikin, father, mama be teacher. When we dey for school, teacher be teacher. Now dey university, Lecturer be teacher. When we start to work, government be teacher. Who be government teacher? Culture and tradition! I don pass pikin, I don pass school, university, sef a pass. As I don start to work, na government I must sef a pass. Inside, there was music and dancing and everybody was happy waiting patiently for the food. As we move into a new age, not marked by industry but by innovation, it is interesting that the African continent is moving into the spotlight. I pledge to my dark skin to be loving, caring and kind. Colorism, racism’s evil cousin lurks around in the shadows and causes havoc subconsciously in the black community.

How much longer will we continue to do so? I am in no way undermining the impact that colonization had on different African countries, neither am I implying that we should forget that it happened. Born and bred, buttered and toasted, farmed and harvested, I’ve been through a process in the land I call my own, my home, my Nigeria. Everything covered but her eyes, what a cruel, male-dominated culture. Hopefully my Christmas plans aren’t ruined because of some rogues. She’s good… for a female. Dilapidated training facilities and little to no funds dedicated to providing adequate training in countries like Somalia can cause the debate to go both ways. I think that those who practice the age-old adage “If loving you is wrong, then I don’t want to be right” are the absolute winners when it comes to relationships, love, and withstanding the scrutiny of society. And the next time you want to get angry about the ‘single story’, ask yourself why.

I’m not sure if you’d have recognized, but each sentence prior to this one is from a previous Rise Africa post from over the past year. Twelve months since the very first monthly theme post, we’ve considerably overcome the single story; dwelling on topics of race, identity, love and a host of other issues. In light of this, this month’s theme is “Freelance”, dedicated to the many stories shared on this platform. This means, posts will be on anything you wish. We’ll be sharing and discussing personal experiences, current events and controversial topics. Fully express nothing will be off limits as we welcome all subject matter. Our goal is to build a community of Africans who have the confidence to speak their voice and the awareness to engage in productive conversation with one another about the shared and unique lives we live as Africans and members of the African diaspora.

As always, we value your participation. Share your Free-writes with the entire Rise Africa community. If you or someone you know would be interested in participating in this series, we encourage you to contribute. Just e-mail us at info@africaisdonesuffering.com for more information. Click to access all articles under our theme for March 2013, “Freelance.”

-Michael Annor

March 2013: Freelance
A mischievous smile widened my lips. I liked this world. I was glad I was born in this era. There’s a vast wealth of information, an app for anything that makes you tick and for every sport. We know from the beginning he gets the diamonds so we know that is not the point of the movie. So, what is the point? As secure as I feel in my identity as a Ugandan-American, I fear the dissolution of being “Ugandan” without an understanding of “my” language. Those sketches became actual illustrations and it was asked that they be used for the South African Pavillion in the 2010 Shanghai World Expo. What future are we talking about? What kinds of things do you expect from the continent? When we be pikin, father, mama be teacher. When we dey for school, teacher be teacher. Now dey university, Lecturer be teacher. When we start to work, government be teacher. Who be government teacher? Culture and tradition! I don pass pikin, I don pass school, university, sef a pass. As I don start to work, na government I must sef a pass. Inside, there was music and dancing and everybody was happy waiting patiently for the food. As we move into a new age, not marked by industry but by innovation, it is interesting that the African continent is moving into the spotlight. I pledge to my dark skin to be loving, caring and kind. Colorism, racism’s evil cousin lurks around in the shadows and causes havoc subconsciously in the black community.
How much longer will we continue to do so? I am in no way undermining the impact that colonization had on different African countries, neither am I implying that we should forget that it happened. Born and bred, buttered and toasted, farmed and harvested, I’ve been through a process in the land I call my own, my home, my Nigeria. Everything covered but her eyes, what a cruel, male-dominated culture. Hopefully my Christmas plans aren’t ruined because of some rogues. She’s good… for a female. Dilapidated training facilities and little to no funds dedicated to providing adequate training in countries like Somalia can cause the debate to go both ways. I think that those who practice the age-old adage “If loving you is wrong, then I don’t want to be right” are the absolute winners when it comes to relationships, love, and withstanding the scrutiny of society. And the next time you want to get angry about the ‘single story’, ask yourself why.
I’m not sure if you’d have recognized, but each sentence prior to this one is from a previous Rise Africa post from over the past year. Twelve months since the very first monthly theme post, we’ve considerably overcome the single story; dwelling on topics of race, identity, love and a host of other issues. In light of this, this month’s theme is “Freelance”, dedicated to the many stories shared on this platform. This means, posts will be on anything you wish. We’ll be sharing and discussing personal experiences, current events and controversial topics. Fully express nothing will be off limits as we welcome all subject matter. Our goal is to build a community of Africans who have the confidence to speak their voice and the awareness to engage in productive conversation with one another about the shared and unique lives we live as Africans and members of the African diaspora.
As always, we value your participation. Share your Free-writes with the entire Rise Africa community. If you or someone you know would be interested in participating in this series, we encourage you to contribute. Just e-mail us at info@africaisdonesuffering.com for more information. Click to access all articles under our theme for March 2013, “Freelance.”
-Michael Annor High-res