The Bright Side of Life


Growing up as a child in Nigeria, there were certain things that I thought were normal because they happened so frequently, for instance, losing electricity. What I remember mostly when I was younger was angrily shouting, “NEPA!” (Nigeria Electric Power Authority), when the lights would suddenly cut off.  Now that I’m older, every time I travel home to visit one complaint of mine that has remained from childhood is the inconsistent electricity.

The amount of resources Nigeria uses to run and maintain gas generators in order to supplement the constant lack of electricity is impeding our county’s growth. This hinders prevents the country from committing resources to developing a dependable power supply. Every day in Nigeria, we see new models of generators, (silent, diesel only, hybrid. etc.) but none of them seem to be working effectively. Fortunately, the most promising new green energy technology for Africa is solar power. It’s seemingly self-sustaining and fits Africa’s endowment of sunlight, offering the prospect of a leapfrog technology comparable to mobile phones.

I am proud of Ghana and the steps they have taken and achieved towards this issue. After years of an unreliable power supply that has crippled a number of industries on the continent and caused considerable damage to the economies spread throughout Africa, the Ghanaian government introduced solar energy to the nation to improve the electricity supply and gave the nation just what it needed. The biggest photovoltaic (PV) and largest solar energy plant in Africa, the Nzema project, based in Ghana, will be able to provide electricity to more than 100,000 homes. Unlike many other solar projects in Africa that use concentrated solar power, solar plants will use photovoltaic (PV) technology to convert sunlight directly into electricity.

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The Bright Side of Life
Growing up as a child in Nigeria, there were certain things that I thought were normal because they happened so frequently, for instance, losing electricity. What I remember mostly when I was younger was angrily shouting, “NEPA!” (Nigeria Electric Power Authority), when the lights would suddenly cut off.  Now that I’m older, every time I travel home to visit one complaint of mine that has remained from childhood is the inconsistent electricity.
The amount of resources Nigeria uses to run and maintain gas generators in order to supplement the constant lack of electricity is impeding our county’s growth. This hinders prevents the country from committing resources to developing a dependable power supply. Every day in Nigeria, we see new models of generators, (silent, diesel only, hybrid. etc.) but none of them seem to be working effectively. Fortunately, the most promising new green energy technology for Africa is solar power. It’s seemingly self-sustaining and fits Africa’s endowment of sunlight, offering the prospect of a leapfrog technology comparable to mobile phones.
I am proud of Ghana and the steps they have taken and achieved towards this issue. After years of an unreliable power supply that has crippled a number of industries on the continent and caused considerable damage to the economies spread throughout Africa, the Ghanaian government introduced solar energy to the nation to improve the electricity supply and gave the nation just what it needed. The biggest photovoltaic (PV) and largest solar energy plant in Africa, the Nzema project, based in Ghana, will be able to provide electricity to more than 100,000 homes. Unlike many other solar projects in Africa that use concentrated solar power, solar plants will use photovoltaic (PV) technology to convert sunlight directly into electricity.
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